Can We Please Get a Politician that Changes His or Her Mind?

I’d much rather have a politician that changes his/her mind over one that always sticks to the same positions. Public political discourse punishes politicians that change their positions over time. Instead, we should applaud. Continue reading Can We Please Get a Politician that Changes His or Her Mind? ... Continue Reading →

Digital Curation Issues Involving Open Government Data

Open data is a well-defined concept but in the public sector, there is some difficult work ahead for its digital curation. Although the support and production of open data from governments around the world varies (with many not yet supporting it at all) there are clear movements to encourage and grow open government data initiatives. Within the realm of governments that do support and produce datasets open to the p ... Continue Reading →

E-books: New Experiences and Problems with Access

I first read an e-book a few years ago when I decided to see how War and Peace felt on my phone. Engrossing. And probably no less so than it is on paper. Now I like both paper books and e-books but the spread of e-books is about more than just enjoying them or not. The introduction of e-books (among other digital content) changed the interactions and responsibilities of publishers, authors, academics, librarians, g ... Continue Reading →

“Strategic” Voting Weakens Democracy

“Strategic” voting is a bad idea. Organized “strategic” voting improves nothing. Worse, “strategic” voting creates an illusion of trust where there are no possible checks and balances. It’s a scheme just asking to be gamed. Participants in “strategic” voting schemes will get taken advantage of and lose their voices. The aberration of “strategic” voti ... Continue Reading →

Data, Information, Knowledge, and Wisdom: Our Pragmatic Ignorance

A common way to model the relationships of data, information, knowledge, and wisdom is the DIKW pyramid. Starting with its base, each concept builds on top of the former. The gist is that we require data to form information → we use information to gain knowledge → and we use knowledge toward developing wisdom. This model is one doorway to understanding the relationship between these concepts. For workaday pragm ... Continue Reading →

Timeline of Conservatives’ Deeds Against Science

In the Confessions of a Science Librarian blog, John Dupuy writes about the Harper Conservatives’ war against science. He’s logged and linked activities from 2006 to 2013 that show how the Conservatives have muzzled, cut budgets, and otherwise attacked Canada’s scientific research programs. The article is good, the situation is awful. But one area that is a little misleading is the article’s ... Continue Reading →

Compilation of Politics Past

I logged a timeline of public news information about the deeds and direction of those leading our Canadian federal government from 16 October 2008 through 2012. That log was on my Web site named Conserving Memory ( I hoped to maintain an archive in critical blog format for public memory, which could be reviewed for context as new events unfolded. Now it’s 2013 and I don’t want to put the effo ... Continue Reading →

Copyright Law, TPMs, and Appraisal

This is the third part in a series of three posts. Part 1 — The TPM Environment and Copyright Change from C-11 Part 2 — Long Term Digital Preservation and the Role of TDRs Part 3 — Copyright Law, TPMs, and Appraisal Download the whole document (PDF). The Canadian Council of Archives (CCA) identifies five categories of appraisal criteria. Some of these criteria mix poorly with copyright law and TPMs on th ... Continue Reading →

Long Term Digital Preservation and the Role of TDRs

This is the second part in a series of three posts. Part 1 — The TPM Environment and Copyright Change from C-11 Part 2 — Long Term Digital Preservation and the Role of TDRs Part 3 — Copyright Law, TPMs, and Appraisal Download the whole document (PDF). Archives face inexorable problems with the duty to preserve massive quantities of information, stored on frail digital media. There is at once, the archives ... Continue Reading →

How Recent Copyright Legislation (C-11) and TPMs Prevent Digital Preservation

Recent copyright legislation prevents archives from legitimately fulfilling key requirements for the long term preservation and provision of access to digital fonds. Bill C-11 (An Act to amend the Copyright Act)[1] changed many elements of copyright law but the area posing the greatest problems to archival practices is the portion that prohibits circumventing technological protection measures (TPMs). The problems s ... Continue Reading →

Should the NDP Renew Itself with a Shoot of Green?

Before our last federal election in 2010, I’d proposed a rationale for the NDP and Green Party to merge (from an NDP perspective). With the NDP leadership convention operating at full speed, now is a great time to reconsider this idea. In fact, one of the NDP’s recurring debate themes involves whether or not the party should undertake some challenges that cut to the heart of its identity. It might seem ... Continue Reading →

Last Little Fascination

Hot sun and oh, a band of round rubber! There on the ground, stretching I, down and I can reach it. Another rubber band for me. This hot day would’ve broken it. The edges, on days like this, get cracks if they’ve ever been rained on. And then it will stop being elastic. When I stretch it, it won’t snap back to its oval—it will stay and then break apart. I won’t stretch this one. It’s ... Continue Reading →

Time to Establish a Green Social Democratic Party (GSDP)

Why is there both a New Democratic Party (NDP) and a Green Party? Examine them, really read their positions and philosophies. The two parties are essentially the same and where they’re not, they’re frequently complementary. In the following, I’ll present why I think the two parties must merge and what it might look like if they did. Continue reading Time to Establish a Green Social Democratic Party (GSDP) ... Continue Reading →